Meow Media

Meow Media

I was going through my newsletter stack today and came across this article. Before I delved into the article, I toggle these options back and forth a few times. The author basically provided two versions of the article for the reader: One that contains the entire article, and another one with a one-paragraph summary on top and extra sections unexpanded at the bottom.
This allows the reader to choose which version to read depending on the time available at hand.
Cool stuff.

I was going through my newsletter stack today and came across this article. Before I delved into the article, I toggle these options back and forth a few times. The author basically provided two versions of the article for the reader: One that contains the entire article, and another one with a one-paragraph summary on top and extra sections unexpanded at the bottom.

This allows the reader to choose which version to read depending on the time available at hand.

Cool stuff.

I recently signed up a Slack account for my team. While pleasantly surprised how well the app works, I wasn’t seeing any of my team members sign up for it.
Guess what? Turned out that their custom domain sign up page (name.slack.com/signup) doesn’t explain what Slack does.
Of course people aren’t going to sign up for unknown things.

I recently signed up a Slack account for my team. While pleasantly surprised how well the app works, I wasn’t seeing any of my team members sign up for it.

Guess what? Turned out that their custom domain sign up page (name.slack.com/signup) doesn’t explain what Slack does.

Of course people aren’t going to sign up for unknown things.

I like small, pleasant surprises—Things that cause the corner of my mouth to raise a bit.
This is a screenshot from Kickstarter’s search page. As you can see, the search takes three criteria: A category, a location, and a sorting method. Well, instead of using the standard location keyword of “International”, they chose to use “Earth”. Also, “Magic” is one of the search criteria, although I am quite sure the it is not actually sorted using magic.
Nothing fancy here, just cheeky enough to differentiate itself from other sites’ search pages.

I like small, pleasant surprises—Things that cause the corner of my mouth to raise a bit.

This is a screenshot from Kickstarter’s search page. As you can see, the search takes three criteria: A category, a location, and a sorting method. Well, instead of using the standard location keyword of “International”, they chose to use “Earth”. Also, “Magic” is one of the search criteria, although I am quite sure the it is not actually sorted using magic.

Nothing fancy here, just cheeky enough to differentiate itself from other sites’ search pages.

I hope Adobe would understand that, as I login in as a paid subscriber, I am not looking for a trial or choosing a plan, but only to download the CC apps.

I hope Adobe would understand that, as I login in as a paid subscriber, I am not looking for a trial or choosing a plan, but only to download the CC apps.

Play Framework has a debatable solution for downloading their logos: You right click the logo on top left corner of the page.
Unlike some other open source sites that host their logos on a separate page, such as Node.js, which can be found with just a quick Google search, Play Framework’s approach makes it almost impossible to be found, unless stumbled upon by chance. 

Play Framework has a debatable solution for downloading their logos: You right click the logo on top left corner of the page.

Unlike some other open source sites that host their logos on a separate page, such as Node.js, which can be found with just a quick Google search, Play Framework’s approach makes it almost impossible to be found, unless stumbled upon by chance. 

Roommates.com has a very deceptive practice of luring you in to pay for their service.
Their dark pattern works like this: You sign up for an account to search for rental postings, and it prompts you through a process of setting up your account. It then takes you to a page that list all the matches with some basic info of each one. After you look through most of them, you chose a few candidates and you send them a message, hoping to get in touch and talk about the listing… But once you have received a mail, you cannot open it without paying for an upgrade. At this point, I pretty much guarantee that you would be thinking “I have to pay? Why didn’t they tell me?”
It would be understandable if, during the registration process, you are clearly notified that certain features are only available to paid users. However, there is no heads-up in the registration steps, and you won’t find out about these restrictions until you run into them later on, such as viewing higher resolution photos - Or in this case, opening a message sent out by another user - By then, you are more eager to pay for an upgrade than ever. 

Roommates.com has a very deceptive practice of luring you in to pay for their service.

Their dark pattern works like this: You sign up for an account to search for rental postings, and it prompts you through a process of setting up your account. It then takes you to a page that list all the matches with some basic info of each one. After you look through most of them, you chose a few candidates and you send them a message, hoping to get in touch and talk about the listing… But once you have received a mail, you cannot open it without paying for an upgrade. At this point, I pretty much guarantee that you would be thinking “I have to pay? Why didn’t they tell me?”

It would be understandable if, during the registration process, you are clearly notified that certain features are only available to paid users. However, there is no heads-up in the registration steps, and you won’t find out about these restrictions until you run into them later on, such as viewing higher resolution photos - Or in this case, opening a message sent out by another user - By then, you are more eager to pay for an upgrade than ever. 

My boss interrupted my team in the middle of a brainless discussion (we were talking about how the US gov’s “alien registration code” is not being used correctly to address extraterrestrial life form), and cheerfully recommended us to try out the Glide app.

Upon opening the app, I recorded a few video messages to send to GlideBot, and deleted them to check the handling of message deletion… And I noticed something: The deleted videos take up as much space as the undeleted ones, and you cannot interact with them. Which means, if for any reason you end up having to delete a dozen of videos inside a chat session, it will occupy a significant chunk of screen estate that results into multiple swiping.

Currently, it doesn’t seem like Glide allows its user to download the recorded video. In this case, the only way to keep the videos is make sure you don’t leave a chat session. So, if you are a goofball like me, you will end up deleting a ton of videos afterward… Less swiping will at least (hopefully) prevent you from getting repetitive strain injury.

Another “Unsubscribe” Not Done Right

I signed up an account on 500px few weeks ago to test their service. However, due to the fact that I am not much of a photographer, I have not logged on since then.

Today, I received this email from them. After a quick thought through, I came to the realization that I would never use their service again. So I scrolled down to the bottom of the email expecting an “unsubscribe” button:

image

… Except there isn’t one. Instead, I saw a link that says “Manage your email notifications.”

So I clicked that, and this is the page that opened up:

image

… I am quite disappointed.

There are two mysteries here. First is the absence of “unsubscribe” button: Why is it not in the email? Second, there are 13 checkboxes: Why isn’t there a master option that checks/unchecks everything all at once? Better yet - Get the first step done right and you won’t have to worry about the second one.

Viral Doza uses a growth technique that I called “click robbery”. In this case, the last picture is locked until you click on the Facebook like button or the Twitter share button. 

Interestingly, an identical article is also featured on Viral Nova, except the last picture is not locked.

Upon a closer look, the distinction between the two is that Viral Doza doesn’t provide any info regarding the site owner or its background, while Viral Nova does. This led me to suspect that if Viral Doza is simply a copycat… Not cool, Doza, not cool.